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J Epidemiol. 2010;20(5):385-90. Epub 2010 Aug 7.

A 4-year study of the association between short sleep duration and change in body mass index in Japanese male workers.

Author information

1
Department of Safety and Health, Tokyo Gas Co, Ltd, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan. chihiro.n@tokyo-gas.co.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies of Western populations have shown an inconsistent longitudinal association between short sleep duration and change in body mass index (BMI); a recent Japanese cohort study reported a significant association in men, but over a 1-year period. The aim of this longitudinal study was to examine whether this association was robust over a 4-year interval in Japanese men.

METHODS:

A total of 3803 middle-aged Japanese male white-collar workers (mean age 47.8 years, mean BMI 23.9 kg/m(2)) in Tokyo, Japan, were included in this study from 1994-1995 (baseline) to 1998-1999 (follow-up). Height and weight were objectively measured at annual health checkups, and other data, including sleep duration, were collected using a structured interview. We used linear regression models to estimate change in BMI, after adjustment for covariates. The reference category for sleep duration was set to 7 hours, to conform with previous studies.

RESULTS:

As compared with participants sleeping 7 hours, those sleeping 5 hours or less had a significantly higher BMI at baseline (beta coefficient: 0.34 kg/m(2), 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03, 0.65) and gained 0.15 kg/m(2) in BMI over 4 years (95% CI: 0.03, 0.27), after adjustment for age, baseline BMI, lifestyle behavior, and medication.

CONCLUSIONS:

The longitudinal association between short sleep duration at baseline and relative increase in BMI was significant in Japanese male workers over a 4-year interval.

PMID:
20699599
PMCID:
PMC3900833
DOI:
10.2188/jea.je20100019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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