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BMC Public Health. 2010 Aug 9;10:467. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-467.

Association between weight perception and socioeconomic status among adults in the Seychelles.

Author information

1
Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine IUMSP, University Hospital Centre and University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 17, 1005 Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few studies have examined the association between weight perception and socioeconomic status (SES) in sub-Saharan Africa, and none made this association based on education, occupation and income simultaneously.

METHODS:

Based on a population-based survey (n = 1255) in the Seychelles, weight and height were measured and self-perception of one's own body weight, education, occupation, and income were assessed by a questionnaire. Individuals were considered to have appropriate weight perception when their self-perceived weight matched their actual body weight.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 35% and 28%, respectively. Multivariate analysis among overweight/obese persons showed that appropriate weight perception was directly associated with actual weight, education, occupation and income, and that it was more frequent among women than among men. In a model using all three SES indicators together, only education (OR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.3-4.8) and occupation (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.2-4.5) were independently associated with appropriate perception of being overweight. The OR reached 6.9 [95% CI: 3.4-14.1] when comparing the highest vs. lowest categories of SES based on a score including all SES indicators and 6.1 [95% CI: 3.0-12.1] for a score based on education and occupation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Appropriately perceiving one's weight as too high was associated with different SES indicators, female sex and being actually overweight. These findings suggest means and targets for clinical and population-based interventions for weight control. Further studies should examine whether these differences in weight perception underlie differences in cognitive skills, healthy weight norms, or body size ideals.

PMID:
20696072
PMCID:
PMC2924291
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2458-10-467
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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