Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Perinatol. 2011 Feb;28(2):157-63. doi: 10.1055/s-0030-1263299. Epub 2010 Aug 6.

Preterm birth and adolescent bone mineral content.

Author information

1
College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. marta.erlandson@usask.ca

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of preterm low birth weight on bone mineral content in adolescence. In 2007 to 2008, data on adolescents were obtained for study, including 16 females and 25 males who were born preterm (≤37 weeks' gestation) between October 1, 1989, and December 31, 1995, with a birth weight of less than 1850 g. Preterm low-birth-weight individuals were age- and sex-matched to full-term (>37 weeks) normal-birth-weight (>2500 g) controls. Total body, hip, and spine bone mineral content (BMC) was assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Male preterm individuals had less BMC at the proximal femur in adolescence compared with controls ( p < 0.05). However, once adjusted for age, maturity, height, weight, physical activity, and diet, there were no differences between groups ( p < 0.05) in any bone parameters. These findings suggest that preterm birth and low birth weight did not influence bone accrual in these individuals at adolescence.

PMID:
20694944
DOI:
10.1055/s-0030-1263299
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York
    Loading ...
    Support Center