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Nutrition. 2010 Sep;26(9):862-6. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2010.05.008.

Basics in nutrition and wound healing.

Author information

1
University Clinic of Surgery, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria. thomas.wild@pmu.ac.at

Abstract

Wound healing is a process that can be divided into three different phases (inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation). Each is characterized by certain events that require specific components. However, wound healing is not always a linear process; it can progress forward and backward through the phases depending on various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. If the wound-healing process is affected negatively, this can result in chronic wounds. Chronic wounds demand many resources in the clinical daily routine. Therefore, local wound management and good documentation of the wound is essential for non-delayed wound healing and prevention of the development of chronic wounds. During the wound-healing process much energy is needed. The energy for the building of new cells is usually released from body energy stores and protein reserves. This can be very challenging for undernourished and malnourished patients. Malnutrition is very common in geriatric patients and patients in catabolic phases of stress such as after injury or surgery. For that reason a close survey of the nutritional status of patients is necessary to start supplementation quickly, if applicable. Wound healing is indeed a very complex process that deserves special notice. There are some approaches to develop guidelines but thus far no golden standard has evolved. Because wounds, especially chronic wounds, cause also an increasing economic burden, the development of guidelines should be advanced.

PMID:
20692599
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2010.05.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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