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Database (Oxford). 2010 Aug 5;2010:baq019. doi: 10.1093/database/baq019.

GPCRs, G-proteins, effectors and their interactions: human-gpDB, a database employing visualization tools and data integration techniques.

Author information

1
Structural and Computational Biology Unit, EMBL, Meyerhofstrasse 1, Heidelberg D69117, Germany.

Abstract

G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a major family of membrane receptors in eukaryotic cells. They play a crucial role in the communication of a cell with the environment. Ligands bind to GPCRs on the outside of the cell, activating them by causing a conformational change, and allowing them to bind to G-proteins. Through their interaction with G-proteins, several effector molecules are activated leading to many kinds of cellular and physiological responses. The great importance of GPCRs and their corresponding signal transduction pathways is indicated by the fact that they take part in many diverse disease processes and that a large part of efforts towards drug development today is focused on them. We present Human-gpDB, a database which currently holds information about 713 human GPCRs, 36 human G-proteins and 99 human effectors. The collection of information about the interactions between these molecules was done manually and the current version of Human-gpDB holds information for about 1663 connections between GPCRs and G-proteins and 1618 connections between G-proteins and effectors. Major advantages of Human-gpDB are the integration of several external data sources and the support of advanced visualization techniques. Human-gpDB is a simple, yet a powerful tool for researchers in the life sciences field as it integrates an up-to-date, carefully curated collection of human GPCRs, G-proteins, effectors and their interactions. The database may be a reference guide for medical and pharmaceutical research, especially in the areas of understanding human diseases and chemical and drug discovery. Database URLs: http://schneider.embl.de/human_gpdb; http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/human_gpdb/.

PMID:
20689020
PMCID:
PMC2931634
DOI:
10.1093/database/baq019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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