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Chest. 2011 Feb;139(2):353-360. doi: 10.1378/chest.10-0968. Epub 2010 Aug 5.

Vitamin D deficiency and reduced lung function in connective tissue-associated interstitial lung diseases.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.
2
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.
3
Department of Pathology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.
4
Department of Radiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.
5
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH. Electronic address: brent.kinder@uc.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vitamin D is a steroid hormone with pleiotropic effects including immune system modulation, lung tissue remodeling, and bone health. Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in the development of autoimmune diseases. We sought to evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a cohort of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and hypothesized that vitamin D deficiency would be associated with an underlying connective tissue disease (CTD) and reduced lung function.

METHODS:

Patients in the University of Cincinnati ILD Center database were evaluated for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels as part of a standardized protocol. Regression analysis evaluated associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and other variables.

RESULTS:

One hundred eighteen subjects were included (67 with CTD-ILD, 51 with other forms of ILD). The overall prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in the study population was 38% and 59%, respectively. Those with CTD-ILD were more likely to have vitamin D deficiency (52% vs 20%, P < .0001) and insufficiency (79% vs 31%, P < .0001) than other forms of ILD. Diminished FVC was associated with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) levels (P = .01). The association between vitamin D insufficiency and CTD-ILD persisted (OR, 11.8; P < .0001) after adjustment for potential confounders. Among subjects with CTD-ILD, reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) levels were strongly associated with reduced lung function (FVC, P = .015; diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, P = .004).

CONCLUSIONS:

There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with ILD, particularly those with CTD-ILD, and it is associated with reduced lung function. Vitamin D may have a role in the pathogenesis of CTD-ILD.

PMID:
20688927
PMCID:
PMC3032366
DOI:
10.1378/chest.10-0968
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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