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J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2010 Aug;20(8):542-4. doi: 08.2010/JCPSP.542544.

Post-tuberculous chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Multan Cantt. inammbaig@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the frequency of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a sequel of treated pulmonary tuberculosis.

STUDY DESIGN:

A case series.

PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY:

Department of Pulmonology, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from April to November 2007.

METHODOLOGY:

Forty seven adults, previously treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and presenting subsequently with chronic exertional dyspnoea for which no other alternate cause was found were included. Those having a probability of re-activated TB, having history of current or previous smoking or occupational exposure, asthmatics and cases of interstitial lung disease and ischemic heart disease were excluded. Pre- and post-dilator FVC, FEV1 and FEV1/FVC were recorded in each case through simple spirometry on Spirolab-II-MIR S/N 507213. Stage and pattern of COPD was recorded.

RESULTS:

There were 76.5% (n=36) males. Mean age was 56.4 and 44.2 years in males and females respectively. Twenty six (55.3%) were found to have an obstructive ventilatory defect of different degrees: severe/stage III in 69.2% (n=18), moderate/stage II in 23.0 % (n=6) and mild/stage I in 5.9% (n=2). Fourteen (29.7%) were found to have a restrictive pattern and 7 (14.8%) revealed a mixed obstructive and restrictive pattern.

CONCLUSION:

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can occur as one of the chronic complications of pulmonary tuberculosis and the obstructive ventilatory defect appears more common among various pulmonary function derangements.

PMID:
20688021
DOI:
08.2010/JCPSP.542544
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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