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PLoS One. 2010 Jul 29;5(7):e11870. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011870.

Differential modulation of angiogenesis by erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in a mouse model of ischaemic retinopathy.

Author information

1
Centre for Vision and Vascular Science, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) are widely used to treat anaemia but concerns exist about their potential to promote pathological angiogenesis in some clinical scenarios. In the current study we have assessed the angiogenic potential of three ESAs; epoetin delta, darbepoetin alfa and epoetin beta using in vitro and in vivo models.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

The epoetins induced angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells at high doses, although darbepoetin alfa was pro-angiogenic at low-doses (1-20 IU/ml). ESA-induced angiogenesis was VEGF-mediated. In a mouse model of ischaemia-induced retinopathy, all ESAs induced generation of reticulocytes but only epoetin beta exacerbated pathological (pre-retinal) neovascularisation in comparison to controls (p<0.05). Only epoetin delta induced a significant revascularisation response which enhanced normality of the vasculature (p<0.05). This was associated with mobilisation of haematopoietic stem cells and their localisation to the retinal vasculature. Darbepoetin alfa also increased the number of active microglia in the ischaemic retina relative to other ESAs (p<0.05). Darbepoetin alfa induced retinal TNFalpha and VEGF mRNA expression which were up to 4 fold higher than with epoetin delta (p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study has implications for treatment of patients as there are clear differences in the angiogenic potential of the different ESAs.

PMID:
20686695
PMCID:
PMC2912370
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0011870
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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