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Mol Imaging Biol. 2011 Jun;13(3):411-415. doi: 10.1007/s11307-010-0388-8.

Chronic cannabinoid administration to periadolescent rats modulates the metabolic response to acute cocaine in the adult brain.

Author information

1
Psychobiology Department, School of Psychology, UNED, C/Juan del Rosal nº10, 28040, Madrid, Spain. ahigueras@bec.uned.es.
2
Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain. ahigueras@bec.uned.es.
3
Unidad de Medicina y Cirugía Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain.
4
CIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain.
5
Psychobiology Department, School of Psychology, UNED, C/Juan del Rosal nº10, 28040, Madrid, Spain.
6
Department of Pharmaceutical and Food Sciences, School of Pharmacy, CEU University, Madrid, Spain.

Erratum in

  • Mol Imaging Biol. 2011 Aug;13(4):800.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To analyze brain metabolic response to acute cocaine in male and female Wistar rats with or without a history of cannabinoid exposure during periadolescence.

PROCEDURES:

The synthetic cannabinoid agonist CP 55,940 (CP) or its vehicle (VH), were administered to male and female rats during periadolescence. When these animals reached adulthood, saline and cocaine-induced changes in 2-deoxy-2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-D-: glucose (FDG) uptake were studied by positron emission tomography.

RESULTS:

The baseline (post-saline) metabolism in the septal nuclei was higher in CP-females than in VH-females, although septal metabolism was lower in CP-females after cocaine, reaching similar values to those of VH-females at baseline. Cocaine did not affect metabolism in VH-females. Periadolescent cannabinoid treatment did not influence baseline metabolism in males although cocaine reduced the FDG uptake in the dorsal striatum of males that received the VH but not CP.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that cannabinoids during periadolescence modify baseline and cocaine-evoked brain metabolism in a sex-dependent manner. In the case of CP-females, the involvement of septal metabolic alterations in their susceptibility to the rewarding effects of cocaine should be further investigated.

PMID:
20680479
DOI:
10.1007/s11307-010-0388-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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