Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Endocrinol. 2010 Oct;163(4):593-9. doi: 10.1530/EJE-10-0624. Epub 2010 Aug 2.

Metformin is associated with improved left ventricular diastolic function measured by tissue Doppler imaging in patients with diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark. ca@heart.dk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between selected glucose-lowering medications and left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in patients with diabetes.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study (years 2005-2008).

METHODS:

Echocardiograms of 242 patients with diabetes undergoing coronary angiography were analyzed. All patients had an LV ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥20% and were without atrial fibrillation, bundle branch block, valvular disease, or cardiac pacemaker. Patients were grouped according to the use of metformin (n=56), sulfonylureas (n=43), insulin (n=61), and combination treatment (n=82).

RESULTS:

Mean age (66±10 years) and mean LVEF (45±11%) were similar across the groups. Mean isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT) was 66±31, 79±42, 69±23, and 66±29 ms in metformin, sulfonylureas, insulin, and combination treatment groups respectively (P=0.4). Mean early diastolic longitudinal tissue velocity (e') was 5.3±1.6, 4.6±1.6, 5.3±1.8, and 5.4±1.7 cm/s in metformin, sulfonylureas, insulin, and combination treatment groups (P=0.04). In adjusted linear regression models, the use of metformin was associated with a shorter IVRT (parameter estimate -9.9 ms, P=0.049) and higher e' (parameter estimate +0.52 cm/s, P=0.03), compared with no use of metformin. The effects of metformin were not altered by concomitant use of sulfonylureas or insulin (P for interactions >0.4).

CONCLUSIONS:

The use of metformin is associated with improved LV relaxation, as compared with no use of metformin.

PMID:
20679358
DOI:
10.1530/EJE-10-0624
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center