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Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Sep 15;68(6):578-85. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.05.038. Epub 2010 Jul 31.

Genome-wide association-, replication-, and neuroimaging study implicates HOMER1 in the etiology of major depression.

Author information

1
Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Germany. marcella.rietschel@zi-mannheim.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Genome-wide association studies are a powerful tool for unravelling the genetic background of complex disorders such as major depression.

METHODS:

We conducted a genome-wide association study of 604 patients with major depression and 1364 population based control subjects. The top hundred findings were followed up in a replication sample of 409 patients and 541 control subjects.

RESULTS:

Two SNPs showed nominally significant association in both the genome-wide association study and the replication samples: 1) rs9943849 (p(combined) = 3.24E-6) located upstream of the carboxypeptidase M (CPM) gene and 2) rs7713917 (p(combined) = 1.48E-6), located in a putative regulatory region of HOMER1. Further evidence for HOMER1 was obtained through gene-wide analysis while conditioning on the genotypes of rs7713917 (p(combined) = 4.12E-3). Homer1 knockout mice display behavioral traits that are paradigmatic of depression, and transcriptional variants of Homer1 result in the dysregulation of cortical-limbic circuitry. This is consistent with the findings of our subsequent human imaging genetics study, which revealed that variation in single nucleotide polymorphism rs7713917 had a significant influence on prefrontal activity during executive cognition and anticipation of reward.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings, combined with evidence from preclinical and animal studies, suggest that HOMER1 plays a role in the etiology of major depression and that the genetic variation affects depression via the dysregulation of cognitive and motivational processes.

PMID:
20673876
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.05.038
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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