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J Clin Invest. 2010 Aug;120(8):2910-9. doi: 10.1172/JCI42273. Epub 2010 Jul 26.

Nicotinic acid- and monomethyl fumarate-induced flushing involves GPR109A expressed by keratinocytes and COX-2-dependent prostanoid formation in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Max-Planck-Institute for Heart and Lung Research, Bad Nauheim, Germany.

Abstract

The antidyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid and the antipsoriatic drug monomethyl fumarate induce cutaneous flushing through activation of G protein-coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A). Flushing is a troublesome side effect of nicotinic acid, but may be a direct reflection of the wanted effects of monomethyl fumarate. Here we analyzed the mechanisms underlying GPR109A-mediated flushing and show that both Langerhans cells and keratinocytes express GPR109A in mice. Using cell ablation approaches and transgenic cell type-specific GPR109A expression in Gpr109a-/- mice, we have provided evidence that the early phase of flushing depends on GPR109A expressed on Langerhans cells, whereas the late phase is mediated by GPR109A expressed on keratinocytes. Interestingly, the first phase of flushing was blocked by a selective cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitor, and the late phase was sensitive to a selective COX-2 inhibitor. Both monomethyl fumarate and nicotinic acid induced PGE2 formation in isolated keratinocytes through activation of GPR109A and COX-2. Thus, the early and late phases of the GPR109A-mediated cutaneous flushing reaction involve different epidermal cell types and prostanoid-forming enzymes. These data will help to guide new efficient approaches to mitigate nicotinic acid-induced flushing and may help to exploit the potential antipsoriatic effects of GPR109A agonists in the skin.

PMID:
20664170
PMCID:
PMC2912194
DOI:
10.1172/JCI42273
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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