Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Aug;110(8):1216-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2010.05.004.

Substituting brown rice for white rice to lower diabetes risk: a focus-group study in Chinese adults.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

Whole-grain products, such as brown rice, have been associated with lower risk of diabetes. However, information is lacking on the acceptability of substituting brown rice for white rice. This study assessed the awareness and acceptability of brown rice in Chinese adults, and examined the feasibility of introducing brown rice into the diet through a large, long-term randomized clinical trial to lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Thirty-two Chinese adults residing in Shanghai participated in this quantitative and qualitative study using questionnaires and focus-group discussions. Most participants (30 of 32) consumed white rice daily and only a few (n=8) had tried brown rice previously. Before tasting, most participants considered brown rice inferior to white rice in terms of taste and quality. However, after tasting brown rice and learning about its nutritional value, the majority indicated greater willingness to consume brown rice. Main barriers to acceptance were the perception of rough texture and unpalatable taste, as well as higher price. All participants suggested that large-scale promotion was needed to change societal attitudes toward brown rice. In addition, most participants (27 of 32) expressed willingness to participate in a future long-term brown rice intervention study. These results provide valuable information for the design of the future brown rice intervention trial and highlight the importance of increasing awareness about the nutritional value of brown rice.

PMID:
20656097
DOI:
10.1016/j.jada.2010.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center