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J Crit Care. 2011 Jun;26(3):280-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2010.05.035. Epub 2010 Jul 23.

A polyurethane cuffed endotracheal tube is associated with decreased rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. melmille@umich.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study was to determine whether the use of a polyurethane-cuffed endotracheal tube would result in a decrease in ventilator-associated pneumonia rate.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We replaced conventional endotracheal tube with a polyurethane-cuff endotracheal tube (Microcuff, Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Rosewell, Ga) in all adult mechanically ventilated patients throughout our large academic hospital from July 2007 to June 2008. We retrospectively compared the rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia before, during, and after the intervention year by interrupted time-series analysis.

RESULTS:

Ventilator-associated pneumonia rates decreased from 5.3 per 1000 ventilator days before the use of the polyurethane-cuffed endotracheal tube to 2.8 per 1000 ventilator days during the intervention year (P = .0138). During the first 3 months after return to conventional tubes, the rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia was 3.5/1000 ventilator days. Use of the polyurethane-cuffed endotracheal tube was associated with an incidence risk ratio of ventilator-associated pneumonia of 0.572 (95% confidence interval, 0.340-0.963). In statistical regression analysis controlling for other possible alterations in the hospital environment, as measured by rate of tracheostomy-ventilator-associated pneumonia, the incidence risk ratio of ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients intubated with polyurethane-cuffed endotracheal tube was 0.565 (P = .032; 95% confidence interval, 0.335-0.953).

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of a polyurethane-cuffed endotracheal tube was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia in our study.

PMID:
20655698
PMCID:
PMC4009728
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2010.05.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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