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Transfus Clin Biol. 2010 Sep;17(3):112-9. doi: 10.1016/j.tracli.2010.06.001. Epub 2010 Jul 23.

Diamond-Blackfan anemia, ribosome and erythropoiesis.

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1
Service d'hématologie biologique, hôpital R.-Debré, 48, boulevard Sérurier, 75019 Paris, France. lydie.dacosta@rdb.aphp.fr

Abstract

Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (five to seven cases per million live births) characterized by an aregenerative, usually macrocytic anemia with an absence or less than 5% of erythroid precursors (erythroblastopenia) in an otherwise normal bone marrow. The platelet and the white cell counts are usually normal but neutropenia, thrombopenia or thrombocytosis have been noted at diagnosis. In 40 to 50% of DBA patients, congenital abnormalities mostly in the cephalic area and in thumbs and upper limbs have been described. Recent analysis did show a phenotype/genotype correlation. Congenital erythroblastopenia of DBA is the first human disease identified to result from defects in ribosomal biogenesis. The first ribosomal gene involved in DBA, ribosomal protein (RP) gene S19 (RPS19 gene), was identified in 1999. Subsequently, mutations in 12 other RP genes out of a total of 78 RP genes have been identified in DBA. All RP gene mutations described to date are heterozygous and dominant inheritance has been documented in 40 to 45% of affected individuals. As RP mutations are yet to be identified in approximately 50% of DBA cases, it is likely that other yet to be identified genes involved in ribosomal biogenesis or other pathways may be responsible for DBA phenotype.

PMID:
20655265
PMCID:
PMC3699172
DOI:
10.1016/j.tracli.2010.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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