Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;11(7):894-903. doi: 10.3109/15622975.2010.505663.

Patients' preference for olanzapine orodispersible tablet compared with conventional oral tablet in a multinational, randomized, crossover study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to compare patients' preference for olanzapine orodispersible tablet (ODT) with oral conventional tablet (OCT).

METHODS:

A 12-week randomized, crossover, multinational, open-label study was conducted to estimate the proportion of patients preferring ODT or OCT. Outpatients with stable schizophrenia on OCT monotherapy were randomly assigned 1:1 to ODT or OCT. Compliance and drug attitude were measured using the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI-10) and Medication Adherence Form (MAF) scales; tolerability and safety by Association for Methodology and Documentation in Psychiatry (AMDP-5) questionnaire and adverse event summary.

RESULTS:

A total of 175 patients answered a preference question: 106 (61%) preferred ODT and 48 (27%) preferred OCT (P<0.001 adjusted for treatment sequence); 21 (12%) expressed no preference. There was no significant change in DAI-10 with either formulation. MAF was above 75% in 94% vs. 93% of patients on ODC and OCT, respectively. Compliance as measured by tablet count was above 98% on both formulations. The adverse event profiles did not differ between formulations. Mean weight increase over 6 weeks on ODT was 0.8 kg and on OCT was 0.6 kg.

CONCLUSIONS:

Given the importance of patients' preference for treatment planning and success, the ODT formulation should be routinely considered as a treatment option.

PMID:
20653494
PMCID:
PMC2981076
DOI:
10.3109/15622975.2010.505663
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Taylor & Francis Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center