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Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2010 Dec;152(12):2089-95. doi: 10.1007/s00701-010-0742-2. Epub 2010 Jul 21.

A role of diffusion tensor imaging in movement disorder surgery.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, University of California Los Angeles, 90095-7039, USA. gbarkhoudarian@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

The safe and reversible nature of deep brain stimulation (DBS) has allowed movement disorder neurosurgery to become commonplace throughout the world. Fundamental understanding of individual patient's anatomy is critical for optimizing the effects and side effects of DBS surgery. Three patients undergoing stereotactic surgery for movement disorders, at the institution's intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging operating suite, were studied with fiber tractography. Stereotactic targets and fiber tractography were determined on preoperative magnetic resonance imagings using the Schaltenbrand-Wahren atlas for definition in the BrainLab iPlan software (BrainLAB Inc., Feldkirchen, Germany). Subthalamic nucleus, globus pallidus interna, and ventral intermediate nucleus targets were studied. Diffusion tensor imaging parameters used ranged from 2 to 8 mm for volume of interest in the x/y/z planes, fiber length was kept constant at 30 mm, and fractional anisotropy threshold varied from 0.20 to 0.45. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography allowed reliable and reproducible visualization and correlation between frontal eye field, premotor, primary motor, and primary sensory cortices via corticospinal tracts and corticopontocerebellar tracts. There is an apparent increase in the number of cortical regions targeted by the fiber tracts as the region of interest is enlarged. This represents a possible mechanism of the increased effects and side effects observed with higher stimulation voltages. Currently available diffusion tensor imaging techniques allow potential methods to characterize the effects and side effects of DBS. This technology has the potential of being a powerful tool to optimize DBS neurosurgery.

PMID:
20652606
PMCID:
PMC2991222
DOI:
10.1007/s00701-010-0742-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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