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Br J Cancer. 2010 Aug 10;103(4):575-80. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6605774. Epub 2010 Jul 20.

Association studies on 11 published colorectal cancer risk loci.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm S17176, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recently, several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have independently found numerous loci at which common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) modestly influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to test 11 loci, reported to be associated with an increased or decreased risk of colorectal cancer: 8q23.3 (rs16892766), 8q24.21 (rs6983267), 9p24 (rs719725), 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842), 14q22.2 (rs4444235), 15q13.3 (rs4779584), 16q22.1 (rs9929218), 18q21.1 (rs4939827), 19q13.1 (rs10411210) and 20p12.3 (rs961253), in a Swedish-based cohort.

METHODS:

The cohort was composed of 1786 cases and 1749 controls that were genotyped and analysed statistically. Genotype-phenotype analysis, for all 11 SNPs and sex, age of onset, family history of CRC and tumour location, was performed.

RESULTS:

Of eleven loci, 5 showed statistically significant odds ratios similar to previously published findings: 8q23.3, 8q24.21, 10p14, 15q13.3 and 18q21.1. The remaining loci 11q23.1, 16q22.1, 19q13.1 and 20p12.3 showed weak trends but somehow similar to what was previously published. The loci 9p24 and 14q22.2 could not be confirmed. We show a higher number of risk alleles in affected individuals compared to controls. Four statistically significant genotype-phenotype associations were found; the G allele of rs6983267 was associated to older age, the G allele of rs1075668 was associated with a younger age and sporadic cases, and the T allele of rs10411210 was associated with younger age.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study, using a Swedish population, supports most genetic variants published in GWAS. More studies are needed to validate the genotype-phenotype correlations.

PMID:
20648012
PMCID:
PMC2939779
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6605774
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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