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BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010 Jul 20;11:165. doi: 10.1186/1471-2474-11-165.

Lifestyle and metabolic factors in relation to shoulder pain and rotator cuff tendinitis: a population-based study.

Author information

1
Centre of Expertise for Health and Work Ability, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland. martti.rechardt@ttl.fi

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Shoulder pain is a common health problem. The purpose of this study was to assess the associations of lifestyle factors, metabolic factors and carotid intima-media thickness with shoulder pain and chronic (> 3 months) rotator cuff tendinitis.

METHODS:

In this cross-sectional study, the target population consisted of subjects aged 30 years or older participating in a national Finnish Health Survey during 2000-2001. Of the 7,977 eligible subjects, 6,237 (78.2%) participated in a structured interview and clinical examination. Chronic rotator cuff tendinitis was diagnosed clinically. Weight-related factors, C-reactive protein and carotid intima-media thickness were measured.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of shoulder joint pain during the preceding 30 days was 16% and that of chronic rotator cuff tendinitis 2.8%. Smoking, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were related to an increased prevalence of shoulder pain in both genders. Metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus and carotid intima-media thickness were associated with shoulder pain in men, whereas high level of C-reactive protein was associated with shoulder pain in women. Increased waist circumference and type 1 diabetes mellitus were associated with chronic rotator cuff tendinitis in men.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings showed associations of abdominal obesity, some other metabolic factors and carotid intima-media thickness with shoulder pain. Disturbed glucose metabolism and atherosclerosis may be underlying mechanisms, although not fully supported by the findings of this study. Prospective studies are needed to further investigate the role of lifestyle and metabolic factors in shoulder disorders.

PMID:
20646281
PMCID:
PMC3161397
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2474-11-165
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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