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Exp Brain Res. 2010 Aug;205(2):153-65. doi: 10.1007/s00221-010-2347-7. Epub 2010 Jul 20.

Anticipatory postural adjustments in children with typical motor development.

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1
Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.

Abstract

Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) play an important role in the performance of many activities requiring the maintenance of vertical posture. However, little is known about how children utilize APAs during self-induced postural perturbations. A group of children, aged 7-16 years, with typical motor development, performed various arm movements while standing on a force platform. APAs were measured by recording the electromyographic activity of six trunk and leg muscles on both sides of the body and displacement of center of pressure (COP). Anticipatory bursts of activity in the dorsal muscle groups of the trunk and legs and suppression in the ventral muscle groups as well as posterior COP displacement were found during the performance of bilateral shoulder flexion. Conversely, during bilateral shoulder extension, the COP displacement was anterior, and APAs were reversed showing bursts of activity in the ventral muscle groups and suppression in the dorsal muscles. During right and left reciprocal arm movements, COP displacement was minimal and APAs were generated in the dorsal muscle groups on the side of the forward moving arm and in the ventral muscle groups on the side of the arm moving into extension. However this pattern reversed for lower leg muscles, where APAs were generated in the ventral muscles on the side of forward moving arm and in the dorsal muscle on the side of the arm moving into extension. The results of this study indicate that children with typical motor development are able to generate APAs, produce task-specific sequencing of muscle activity and differentiate between perturbations in the sagittal and transverse planes. The results of this study indicate that by at least age 7, children who are typically developing demonstrate the ability to generate patterns of anticipatory muscle activation and suppression, along with center of pressure changes, similar to those reported in healthy adults.

PMID:
20644921
DOI:
10.1007/s00221-010-2347-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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