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J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2010 Jul;20(7):464-7. doi: 04.2010/JCPSP.464467.

Analgesic effect of Nigella sativa seeds extract on experimentally induced pain in albino mice.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan. dr.gujar@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the analgesic effect of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds on experimentally-induced pain in albino mice.

STUDY DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial (RCT).

PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY:

Physiology Department, Services Institute of Medical Sciences (SIMS), Lahore, from May to September, 2009.

METHODOLOGY:

The study was carried out in 90 male albino mice using acetic acid induced writhing test as a chemical model of nociception. The mice were divided in three groups of 30 each. Group A was given normal saline (control); group B was given Nigella sativa seed extract in a dose of 50 mg/kg; and group C received diclofenac sodium, as a reference drug. Number of writhings in treated and control groups were compared.

RESULTS:

The ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds given intraperitoneally caused significant (p < 0.05) analgesic effect on nociceptive response initiated by 0.6% acetic acid; although this analgesic effect was less than that produced by diclofenac sodium.

CONCLUSION:

Ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa possessed significant analgesic effect in mice.

PMID:
20642947
DOI:
04.2010/JCPSP.464467
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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