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Am J Public Health. 2010 Sep;100(9):1687-95. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2009.179424. Epub 2010 Jul 15.

Integrated schools, segregated curriculum: effects of within-school segregation on adolescent health behaviors and educational aspirations.

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1
Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 800 Sumter St, Room 216, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. kwalsema@sc.edu

Erratum in

  • Am J Public Health. 2011 May;101(5):775.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We examined the extent to which within-school segregation, as measured by unevenness in the distribution of Black and White adolescents across levels of the English curriculum (advanced placement-international baccalaureate-honors, general, remedial, or no English), was associated with smoking, drinking, and educational aspirations, which previous studies found are related to school racial/ethnic composition.

METHODS:

We analyzed data from wave 1 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, restricting our sample to non-Hispanic Blacks (n=2731) and Whites (n=4158) who from 1994 to 1995 attended high schools that enrolled Black and White students.

RESULTS:

White female students had higher predicted probabilities of smoking or drinking than did Black female students; the largest differences were in schools with high levels of within-school segregation. Black male students had higher predicted probabilities of high educational aspirations than did White male students in schools with low levels of within-school segregation; this association was attenuated for Black males attending schools with moderate or high levels of within-school segregation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results provide evidence that within-school segregation may influence both students' aspirations and their behaviors.

PMID:
20634462
PMCID:
PMC2920985
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2009.179424
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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