Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Dec;203(6):552.e1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2010.06.002. Epub 2010 Jul 15.

Long-term outcome of children with congenital toxoplasmosis.

Author information

1
Fédération de Gynécologie Obstétrique, Hôpital Paule de Viguier, Toulouse, France. berrebi.a@chu-toulouse.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Maternal toxoplasmosis infection acquired during pregnancy carries significant risk of fetal damage. We aimed to assess the long-term outcome of children and young adults with congenital toxoplasmosis diagnosed and treated in utero.

STUDY DESIGN:

This was a 20 year prospective study (1985-2005). All mothers received spiramycin, alone or associated with pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine, and underwent amniocentesis and monthly ultrasound screening. Infected children were followed every 3-6 months.

RESULTS:

Of 666 liveborn children (676 mothers), 112 (17%) had congenital toxoplasmosis. Among these, 107 were followed up for 12-250 months: 79 were asymptomatic (74%) and 28 had chorioretinitis (26%). Only 1 child had a serious neurological involvement.

CONCLUSION:

The percentage of chorioretinitis in treated children depends on length of follow-up, but this complication occurs mainly before the age of 5 years and almost always before the age of 10 years. Visual impairment was infrequently severe, and outcome appears consistently good. Long-term follow-up is recommended to monitor ocular and neurological prognosis, whatever the practical difficulties.

Comment in

PMID:
20633868
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2010.06.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center