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Anal Bioanal Chem. 2010 Sep;398(2):779-89. doi: 10.1007/s00216-010-3993-0. Epub 2010 Jul 14.

Quantitative determination of vitamin D metabolites in plasma using UHPLC-MS/MS.

Author information

1
Medical Research Council-Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Fulbourn Road, Cambridge, CB1 9NL, UK.

Abstract

Vitamin D is an important determinant of bone health at all ages. The plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OH D) and other metabolites are used as biomarkers for vitamin sufficiency and function. To allow for the simultaneous determination of five vitamin D metabolites, 25-OH D(3), 25-OH D(2), 24,25-(OH)(2) D(3), 1,25-(OH)(2) D(3), and 1,25-(OH)(2) D(2), in low volumes of human plasma, an assay using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was established. Plasma samples were spiked with isotope-labeled internal standards and pretreated using protein precipitation, solid-phase extraction (SPE) and a Diels-Alder derivatization step with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione. The SPE recovery rates ranged from 55% to 85%, depending on the vitamin D metabolite; the total sample run time was <5 min. Mass spectrometry was conducted using positive ion electrospray ionization in the multiple reaction monitoring mode on a quadrupole-quadrupole-linear ion trap instrument after pre-column addition of methylamine to increase the ionization efficiency. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were 1.6-4.1% and 3.7-6.8%, respectively. The limit of quantitation for these compounds was determined to be between 10 and 20 pg/mL. The 25-OH D results were compared with values obtained for reference materials (DEQAS). In addition, plasma samples were analyzed with two additional Diasorin antibody assays. All comparisons with conventional methods showed excellent correlations (r(2) = 0.9738) for DEQAS samples, demonstrating the high degree of comparability of the new UHPLC-MS/MS technique to existing methods.

PMID:
20628873
PMCID:
PMC2939348
DOI:
10.1007/s00216-010-3993-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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