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Nat Rev Genet. 2010 Aug;11(8):559-71. doi: 10.1038/nrg2814. Epub 2010 Jul 13.

Annotating non-coding regions of the genome.

Author information

1
Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.

Abstract

Most of the human genome consists of non-protein-coding DNA. Recently, progress has been made in annotating these non-coding regions through the interpretation of functional genomics experiments and comparative sequence analysis. One can conceptualize functional genomics analysis as involving a sequence of steps: turning the output of an experiment into a 'signal' at each base pair of the genome; smoothing this signal and segmenting it into small blocks of initial annotation; and then clustering these small blocks into larger derived annotations and networks. Finally, one can relate functional genomics annotations to conserved units and measures of conservation derived from comparative sequence analysis.

PMID:
20628352
DOI:
10.1038/nrg2814
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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