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Scand J Gastroenterol. 2010 Nov;45(11):1329-37. doi: 10.3109/00365521.2010.495416. Epub 2010 Jul 14.

Outcome of endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal tumors accompanied by fibrosis.

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1
Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima University, Minami-ku, Hiroshima, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a difficult procedure. We aimed to retrospectively assess the relationship between the outcome of ESD for colorectal tumors and the degree of fibrosis.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We examined 203 consecutive patients with colorectal tumors larger than 20 mm in diameter who had undergone ESD at our hospital from November 2002 to June 2009. During ESD, the degree of submucosal fibrosis was classified into three types (F0-2). The relationship between the degree of fibrosis and the lesion characteristics and those between the outcome of ESD and the degree of fibrosis were analyzed.

RESULTS:

In the cases of granular laterally spreading tumors, the incidence of F2 fibrosis in nodular mixed-type tumors was significantly higher than that in homogenous-type tumors. An increase in the experience of the operators caused significant improvements in the rates of complete en bloc resection (p = 0.022) and perforation (p = 0.03) in the cases of lesions with F0-1 fibrosis. By contrast, operator experience did not cause any significant improvements in the rates of complete en bloc resection and perforation in the cases of lesions with F2 fibrosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Experienced operators could safely perform complete en bloc resection in the cases of lesions with F0-1 fibrosis. However, in the cases of lesions with F2 fibrosis, the rate of complete en bloc resection was low and the perforation rate was high even when ESD was performed by an experienced operator.

PMID:
20626303
DOI:
10.3109/00365521.2010.495416
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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