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Pain Med. 2010 Jun;11(6):834-40. doi: 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2010.00866.x.

Response to heat pain stimulation in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Pacific Parkinson's Research Centre, 2221 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pain is a prominent nonmotor symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD) but has not been well studied.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study is to assess thermal experience and emotional content, as well as side-to-side sensory differences in PD "off" and "on" dopaminergic therapy following thermal cutaneous stimulation.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional design.

SETTING:

University teaching hospital.

METHODS:

Twelve PD subjects experiencing motor fluctuations but no pain symptoms and 13 healthy controls participated in the study. Heat pain and emotional content were assessed using a thermode and visual analog scales in medication on and off states in PD and without medication in healthy controls.

RESULTS:

There were no side to side differences in heat pain intensity or between PD medication on state and PD medication off state. Unexpectedly, PD subjects reported a higher degree of unpleasantness in response to heat pain while on medication compared with the off state.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that the perception of heat pain is mediated, at least in part, by nondopaminergic systems in PD, while dopamine might modulate the affective component of pain.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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