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J Anim Sci. 2010 Nov;88(11):3693-706. doi: 10.2527/jas.2010-3094. Epub 2010 Jul 9.

BOARD-INVITED REVIEW: fate and transport of bioaerosols associated with livestock operations and manures.

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1
Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research Laboratory, ARS, USDA, Kimberly, ID 83341, USA. robert.dungan@ars.usda.gov

Abstract

Airborne microorganisms and microbial by-products from intensive livestock and manure management systems are a potential health risk to workers and individuals in nearby communities. This report presents information on zoonotic pathogens in animal wastes and the generation, fate, and transport of bioaerosols associated with animal feeding operations and land applied manures. Though many bioaerosol studies have been conducted at animal production facilities, few have investigated the transport of bioaerosols during the land application of animal manures. As communities in rural areas converge with land application sites, concerns over bioaerosol exposure will certainly increase. Although most studies at animal operations and wastewater spray irrigation sites suggest a decreased risk of bioaerosol exposure with increasing distance from the source, many challenges remain in evaluating the health effects of aerosolized pathogens and allergens in outdoor environments. To improve our ability to understand the off-site transport and diffusion of human and livestock diseases, various dispersion models have been utilized. Most studies investigating the transport of bioaerosols during land application events have used a modified Gaussian plume model. Because of the disparity among collection and analytical techniques utilized in outdoor studies, it is often difficult to evaluate health effects associated with aerosolized pathogens and allergens. Invaluable improvements in assessing the health effects from intensive livestock practices could be made if standardized bioaerosol collection and analytical techniques, as well as the use of specific target microorganisms, were adopted.

PMID:
20622180
DOI:
10.2527/jas.2010-3094
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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