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Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Oct;118(10):1458-64. doi: 10.1289/ehp.0901331. Epub 2010 Jul 9.

Childhood exposure to phthalates: associations with thyroid function, insulin-like growth factor I, and growth.

Author information

1
Department of Growth and Reproduction, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. maleneboas@dadlnet.dk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Phthalates are widely used chemicals, and human exposure is extensive. Recent studies have indicated that phthalates may have thyroid-disrupting properties.

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to assess concentrations of phthalate metabolites in urine samples from Danish children and to investigate the associations with thyroid function, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and growth.

METHODS:

In 845 children 4-9 years of age, we determined urinary concentrations of 12 phthalate metabolites and serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroid hormones, and IGF-I.

RESULTS:

Phthalate metabolites were detected in all urine samples, of which monobutyl phthalate was present in highest concentration. Phthalate metabolites were negatively associated with serum levels of free and total triiodothyronine, although statistically significant primarily in girls. Metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and diisononyl phthalate were negatively associated with IGF-I in boys. Most phthalate metabolites were negatively associated with height, weight, body surface, and height gain in both sexes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study showed negative associations between urinary phthalate concentrations and thyroid hormones, IGF-I, and growth in children. Although our study was not designed to reveal the mechanism of action, the overall coherent negative associations between urine phthalate and thyroid and growth parameters may suggest causative negative roles of phthalate exposures for child health.

PMID:
20621847
PMCID:
PMC2957929
DOI:
10.1289/ehp.0901331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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