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J Pediatr Health Care. 2010 Jul-Aug;24(4):222-30. doi: 10.1016/j.pedhc.2009.05.002. Epub 2010 Apr 8.

Parental information and behaviors and provider practices related to tummy time and back to sleep.

Author information

1
Department of Nursing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 3 Solomont Way, Suite 2, Lowell, MA 01854, USA. Ainat_koren@uml.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

This exploratory study aimed to discern parental understanding and behaviors, provider practices, and available online information related to infant positioning including "Back to Sleep" and "Tummy Time" (TT) during early infancy.

METHOD:

The study employed three methods of exploration: surveys of 119 mothers of newborns, a focus group of nine health care providers, and an analysis of popular parental Web sites.

RESULTS:

Ninety percent of the mothers reported receiving information about positioning the infant while asleep. However, only 55% mothers postpartum and 26% at 2 months after birth received information regarding infant positioning during awake time. Providers reported barriers such as lack of time and confusing guidelines to TT education. Parenting Web sites were inconsistent regarding TT initiation and duration information.

DISCUSSION:

Study outcomes suggest that, with the implementation of "Back to Sleep" guidelines, there has been a need for parental education about positioning infants during sleep and awake times.

PMID:
20620848
DOI:
10.1016/j.pedhc.2009.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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