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Am J Ophthalmol. 2010 Sep;150(3):434-440.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2010.04.020. Epub 2010 Jul 8.

Alcohol consumption and the long-term incidence of cataract and cataract surgery: the Blue Mountains Eye Study.

Author information

1
Centre for Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology and Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess whether alcohol consumption is associated with the long-term incidence of cataract or cataract surgery.

DESIGN:

Population-based prospective cohort study.

METHODS:

A total of 3654 persons aged 49+ years were examined at baseline and 2564 were re-examined after 5 and/or 10 years. Lens photographs were taken at each visit and assessed using the Wisconsin Cataract Grading System by masked graders. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on alcohol consumption.

RESULTS:

No significant associations were observed between alcohol consumption and long-term risk of nuclear, cortical, and posterior subcapsular cataract. However, after adjusting for age, gender, smoking, diabetes, myopia, socioeconomic status, and steroid use, total alcohol consumption of over 2 standard drinks per day was associated with a significantly increased likelihood of cataract surgery, when compared to total daily alcohol consumption of 1 to 2 standard drinks (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-3.81). Abstinence from alcohol was also associated with increased likelihood of cataract surgery when compared to a total alcohol consumption of 1 to 2 standard drinks per day (adjusted OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.25-4.46).

CONCLUSION:

A U-shaped association of alcohol consumption with the long-term risk of cataract surgery was found in this older cohort: moderate consumption was associated with 50% lower cataract surgery incidence, compared either to abstinence or heavy alcohol consumption.

PMID:
20619390
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2010.04.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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