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Curr Opin Organ Transplant. 2010 Aug;15(4):405-10. doi: 10.1097/MOT.0b013e32833b7916.

Overcoming the memory barrier in tolerance induction: molecular mimicry and functional heterogeneity among pathogen-specific T-cell populations.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Emory Transplant Center, Emory University, 101 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the frequency and nature of alloreactivity among memory T-cell populations, and discusses recent successes in experimentally targeting these populations in order to prolong graft survival.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Recent studies suggest that not only is alloreactivity present within peripheral T-cell compartments of normal healthy individuals, but cross-reactivity between viral-specific T cells and allotropes may in fact be a very common occurrence. Furthermore, this cross-reactivity functions at the level of molecular mimicry of T-cell receptor recognition. Therapeutics that specifically target cell surface molecules or effector pathways used by memory T cells to mediate graft rejection will likely be required in order to attenuate the donor-reactive memory T-cell response during transplantation.

SUMMARY:

A major challenge facing the field over the next decade is to define the heterogeneity that exists within memory T-cell populations that impacts graft survival. Understanding the functional and phenotypic differences that modify the memory T-cell barrier to tolerance induction might allow a strategy in which strength of immunosuppression could be tailored to fit the immunological history of a given transplant recipient in order to minimize nonimmune toxicities, maximize protective immunity, and prolong graft survival.

PMID:
20616729
PMCID:
PMC4642449
DOI:
10.1097/MOT.0b013e32833b7916
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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