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Curr Opin Organ Transplant. 2010 Aug;15(4):451-5. doi: 10.1097/MOT.0b013e32833b9c11.

The (re)emergence of B cells in organ transplantation.

Author information

1
Division of Transplantation Surgery, Department of Surgery, von Liebig Transplant Center, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. stegall.mark@mayo.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

To outline recent advances in our understanding of the role of B cells in transplantation.

RECENT FINDINGS:

While T-cell-mediated alloimmunity has been largely controlled using immunosuppression, the role of B cells in transplantation is just beginning to be understood. Recent studies have outlined some of the important clinical issues involving antibody including early acute humoral rejection and late transplant glomerulopathy. In addition, recent studies have identified bone-marrow-derived long-lived plasma cells that appear to be a major source of donor-specific alloantibody in sensitized renal transplant recipients. New agents are being tested that deplete these cells in vitro and in vivo. Memory B cells appear to be important in early acute humoral rejection, but few basic studies have been performed. Finally, recent studies involving patients undergoing tolerogenic regimens suggest that T-cell tolerance does not always convey tolerance in naive B cells.

SUMMARY:

Several B cell types have clear and specific roles in transplant recipients. Although our understanding of B cells in transplantation has improved, important gaps remain.

PMID:
20613525
DOI:
10.1097/MOT.0b013e32833b9c11
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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