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Lancet Infect Dis. 2010 Jul;10(7):470-8. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(10)70101-8.

HIV-associated psoriasis: pathogenesis, clinical features, and management.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, 369 Fulham Road, London, UK. n.morar@imperial.ac.uk

Abstract

Psoriasis is a chronic papulosquamous skin disease that is thought to be a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disorder of keratinocyte proliferation. The association between psoriasis and HIV infection seems paradoxical, but insights into the role of T-cell subsets, autoimmunity, genetic susceptibility, and infections associated with immune dysregulation might clarify our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis with HIV in general. HIV-associated psoriasis can be clinically confusing because several comorbid skin disorders in patients with HIV can mimic psoriasis. Phenotypic variants such as a Reiter's syndrome or fulminant erythroderma provide diagnostic clues to underlying immunodeficiency. The management of moderate and severe HIV-associated psoriasis is challenging, although patients typically improve with highly active antiretroviral therapy. Conventional systemic treatments might be contraindicated or need dose adjustment to avoid toxicity. New biological treatments in this setting are promising and warrant further study.

PMID:
20610329
DOI:
10.1016/S1473-3099(10)70101-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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