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Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Feb;35(2):283-91. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2010.131. Epub 2010 Jul 6.

Body mass index, weight change and risk of stroke and stroke subtypes: the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective (JPHC) study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Social Medicine and Medical Informatics, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Japan. saitoi@m.ehime-u.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The Japan Public Health Center-based prospective Study examined the association of body mass index (BMI) and weight change with incident stroke in Japanese individuals, for whom BMI levels are generally low.

METHODS:

We used initial data from 1990 to 1994 and 5-year follow-up surveys from 1995 to 1999. We calculated weight change over a 5-year period for 32,847 men and 38,875 women, aged 45-74 years, with no history of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Subjects were followed from the 1995-1999 survey to the end of 2005, and hazard ratios of self-reported BMI levels and weight change for incident stroke were estimated using Cox's proportional hazard models adjusted for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

During the follow-up period (median 7.9 years) there were 2019 incident strokes, including subtypes. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for all stroke events by BMI levels of 27.0-29.9 and ≥ 30 kg m(-2) versus 23.0-24.9 kg m(-2) were 1.09 (95% confidence interval 0.88, 1.36) and 1.25 (0.86, 1.84) in men (P for trend=0.22), and 1.29 (1.01, 1.65) and 2.16 (1.60, 2.93) in women (P for trend <0.001), respectively. A weight change of ≥ 10% in the previous 5 years was associated with total strokes and ischemic strokes in women.

CONCLUSION:

Higher BMI levels and a weight gain of ≥ 10% over 5 years were associated with an increased risk of stroke in women, whereas this association was weak in men.

PMID:
20603628
DOI:
10.1038/ijo.2010.131
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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