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Mol Cell Proteomics. 2010 Oct;9(10):2125-39. doi: 10.1074/mcp.M110.001214. Epub 2010 Jul 2.

Diurnal changes in mitochondrial function reveal daily optimization of light and dark respiratory metabolism in Arabidopsis.

Author information

1
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, Molecular and Chemical Sciences Building M310 University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia.

Abstract

Biomass production by plants is often negatively correlated with respiratory rate, but the value of this rate changes dramatically during diurnal cycles, and hence, biomass is the cumulative result of complex environment-dependent metabolic processes. Mitochondria in photosynthetic plant tissues undertake substantially different metabolic roles during light and dark periods that are dictated by substrate availability and the functional capacity of mitochondria defined by their protein composition. We surveyed the heterogeneity of the mitochondrial proteome and its function during a typical night and day cycle in Arabidopsis shoots. This used a staged, quantitative analysis of the proteome across 10 time points covering 24 h of the life of 3-week-old Arabidopsis shoots grown under 12-h dark and 12-h light conditions. Detailed analysis of enzyme capacities and substrate-dependent respiratory processes of isolated mitochondria were also undertaken during the same time course. Together these data reveal a range of dynamic changes in mitochondrial capacity and uncover day- and night-enhanced protein components. Clear diurnal changes were evident in mitochondrial capacities to drive the TCA cycle and to undertake functions associated with nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, redox poise, and mitochondrial antioxidant defense. These data quantify the nature and nuances of a daily rhythm in Arabidopsis mitochondrial respiratory capacity.

PMID:
20601493
PMCID:
PMC2953910
DOI:
10.1074/mcp.M110.001214
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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