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Arch Biochem Biophys. 2010 Nov 1;503(1):20-7. doi: 10.1016/j.abb.2010.06.027. Epub 2010 Jul 3.

Fat and bone.

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1
Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. i.reid@auckland.ac.nz

Abstract

Body weight is a principal determinant of bone density and fracture risk, and adipose tissue mass is a major contributor to this relationship. In contrast, some recent studies have argued that "fat mass after adjustment for body weight" actually has a deleterious effect on bone, but these analyses are confounded by the co-linearity between the variables studied, and therefore have produced misleading results. Mechanistically, fat and bone are linked by a multitude of pathways, which ultimately serve the function of providing a skeleton appropriate to the mass of adipose tissue it is carrying. Adiponectin, insulin/amylin/preptin, leptin and adipocytic estrogens are all likely to be involved in this connection. In the clinic, the key issues are that obesity is protective against osteoporosis, but underweight is a major preventable risk factor for fractures.

PMID:
20599663
DOI:
10.1016/j.abb.2010.06.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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