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Obes Surg. 2011 Aug;21(8):1157-60. doi: 10.1007/s11695-010-0229-5.

Revision of failed bariatric procedures to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).

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1
Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Safat, Kuwait. khoursheed@hsc.edu.kw

Abstract

Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity has been established as an effective treatment method and has been shown to be associated with resolution of co-morbidities. Despite its success, some patients may require revision because of weight regain or mechanical complications. From September 2005 to December 2009, 42 patients underwent revisional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). All procedures were performed by one surgeon. Demographics, indications for revision, complications, and weight loss were reviewed. Thirty-seven patients were treated with laparoscopic (n = 36) or open (n = 1) RYGB after failed laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Four patient were treated with laparoscopic (n = 3) or open (n-1) RYGB after failed vertical banded gastroplasty, and one patient underwent open redo RYGB due to large gastric pouch. Conversion rate from laparoscopy to open surgery was 2.5% (one patient). Mean operative time was 145.83 ± 35.19 min, and hospital stay was 3.36 ± 1.20 days. There was no mortality. Early and late complications occurred in six patients (14.2%). The mean follow-up was 15.83 ± 13.43 months. Mean preoperative body mass index was 45.15 ± 7.95 that decreased to 35.23 ± 6.7, and mean percentage excess weight loss was 41.19 ± 20.22 after RYGB within our follow-up period. RYGB as a revisional bariatric procedure is effective to treat complications of restrictive procedures and to further reduce weight in morbidly obese patients.

PMID:
20596789
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-010-0229-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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