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Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Nov;5(11):1922-7. doi: 10.2215/CJN.03240410. Epub 2010 Jul 1.

One-hour postload plasma glucose levels are associated with kidney dysfunction.

Author information

1
Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University Magna-Græcia of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

A cutoff of 155 mg/dl for 1-hour postload plasma glucose (1hPG) during the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is able to identify patients who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes and vascular atherosclerosis. We aimed to examine whether individuals with 1hPG ≥155 mg/dl are also at increased risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD).

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS:

Atherosclerosis risk factors, OGTT, and estimated GFR by Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation were analyzed in 1075 white individuals without diabetes.

RESULTS:

The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for 1hPG was the highest (0.700) compared with the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0, 30-minute, and 2-hour glucose concentrations. Individuals with 1hPG ≥155 mg/dl had a worse cardiometabolic risk profile, exhibiting significantly higher body mass index, BP, triglycerides, and fasting insulin levels and lower HDL, IGF-1 levels, and insulin sensitivity, than individuals with 1hPG <155 mg/dl. Estimated GFR was significantly lower in individuals with 1hPG ≥155 mg/dl. In a logistic regression model adjusted for age and gender, individuals with 1hPG ≥155 mg/dl showed an increased risk for CKD compared with individuals with 1hPG <155 mg/dl. When the logistic regression analysis was restricted to individuals who had normal glucose tolerance, those with 1hPG ≥155 mg/dl showed a higher risk for CKD compared with individuals with 1hPG <155 mg/dl.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest that a cutoff point of 155 mg/dl for the 1hPG during OGTT may be helpful in the identification of individuals who are at increased risk for CKD.

PMID:
20595688
PMCID:
PMC3001771
DOI:
10.2215/CJN.03240410
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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