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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010 Nov 1;182(9):1098-104. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201002-0222OC. Epub 2010 Jul 1.

Wood smoke exposure and gene promoter methylation are associated with increased risk for COPD in smokers.

Author information

1
University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Wood smoke-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is common in women in developing countries but has not been adequately described in developed countries.

OBJECTIVES:

Our objective was to determine whether wood smoke exposure was a risk factor for COPD in a population of smokers in the United States and whether aberrant gene promoter methylation in sputum may modify this association.

METHODS:

For this cross-sectional study, 1,827 subjects were drawn from the Lovelace Smokers' Cohort, a predominantly female cohort of smokers. Wood smoke exposure was self-reported. Postbronchodilator spirometry was obtained, and COPD outcomes studied included percent predicted FEV₁, airflow obstruction, and chronic bronchitis. Effect modification of wood smoke exposure with current cigarette smoke, ethnicity, sex, and promoter methylation of lung cancer-related genes in sputum on COPD outcomes were separately explored. Multivariable logistic and poisson regression models were used for binary and rate-based outcomes, respectively.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Self-reported wood smoke exposure was independently associated with a lower percent predicted FEV₁ (point estimate [± SE] -0.03 ± 0.01) and a higher prevalence of airflow obstruction and chronic bronchitis (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-2.52 and 1.64 (95% confidence interval, 1.31-2.06, respectively). These associations were stronger among current cigarette smokers, non-Hispanic whites, and men. Wood smoke exposure interacted in a multiplicative manner with aberrant promoter methylation of the p16 or GATA4 genes on lower percent predicted FEV₁.

CONCLUSIONS:

These studies identify a novel link between wood smoke exposure and gene promoter methylation that synergistically increases the risk for reduced lung function in cigarette smokers.

PMID:
20595226
PMCID:
PMC3001253
DOI:
10.1164/rccm.201002-0222OC
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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