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Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2010 Jun;5(2-3):111-29. doi: 10.1093/scan/nsq052.

Cultural neuroscience of the self: understanding the social grounding of the brain.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. kitayama@umich.edu

Abstract

Cultural neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field of research that investigates interrelations among culture, mind and the brain. Drawing on both the growing body of scientific evidence on cultural variation in psychological processes and the recent development of social and cognitive neuroscience, this emerging field of research aspires to understand how culture as an amalgam of values, meanings, conventions, and artifacts that constitute daily social realities might interact with the mind and its underlying brain pathways of each individual member of the culture. In this article, following a brief review of studies that demonstrate the surprising degree to which brain processes are malleably shaped by cultural tools and practices, the authors discuss cultural variation in brain processes involved in self-representations, cognition, emotion and motivation. They then propose (i) that primary values of culture such as independence and interdependence are reflected in the compositions of cultural tasks (i.e. daily routines designed to accomplish the cultural values) and further (ii) that active and sustained engagement in these tasks yields culturally patterned neural activities of the brain, thereby laying the ground for the embodied construction of the self and identity. Implications for research on culture and the brain are discussed.

PMID:
20592042
PMCID:
PMC2894676
DOI:
10.1093/scan/nsq052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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