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P N G Med J. 1991 Mar;34(1):6-12.

A review of measles admissions and deaths in the paediatric ward of Goroka Base Hospital during 1989.

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  • 1Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, EHP.

Abstract

We reviewed all measles cases admitted to the paediatric ward of Goroka Base Hospital in 1989, and also interviewed a sample of measles patients attending the paediatric outpatient department. Measles accounted for 11% of all paediatric admissions and 32% of deaths. The case fatality rate for measles was 17%. Children with nosocomial infections and children with low birthweight were more likely to die. The most common complications of measles were pneumonia and diarrhoea, pneumonia being the most common cause of death. Twelve cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis were admitted during the year (0.5% of paediatric admissions). Measles was underreported because it was frequently omitted from the discharge diagnosis, the emphasis being placed on the complications. The majority of children with measles admitted to the ward and seen in outpatients had not been vaccinated. Nosocomial infections could have been reduced if all paediatric admissions aged 6-35 months had been vaccinated on admission. We strongly endorse the policy of vaccinating children in Papua New Guinea against measles from the age of 6 months.

PIP:

The authors reviewed all measles cases admitted to the pediatric ward of Goroka Base Hospital in 1989, and also interviewed a sample of measles patients attending the pediatric outpatient department. Measles accounted for 11% of all pediatric admissions and 32% of deaths. The case fatality rate for measles was 17%. Children with nosocomial infections and those of low birthweight were more likely to die. The most common complications of measles were pneumonia and diarrhea, pneumonia being the most common cause of death. 12 cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis were admitted during the year (0.5% of pediatric admissions). Measles was underreported because it was frequently omitted from the discharge diagnosis, the emphasis being placed on complications. The majority of children with measles admitted to the ward and seen as outpatients had not been vaccinated. Nosocomial infections could have been reduced if all pediatric admissions ages 6-35 months had been vaccinated on admission. The authors strongly endorse the policy of vaccinating children in Papua New Guinea against measles from the age of 6 months.

PMID:
2058304
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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