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PLoS One. 2010 Jun 22;5(6):e11265. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011265.

Cell type mediated resistance of vesicular stomatitis virus and Sendai virus to ribavirin.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina, United States of America.

Abstract

Ribavirin (RBV) is a synthetic nucleoside analog with broad spectrum antiviral activity. Although RBV is approved for the treatment of hepatitis C virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Lassa fever virus infections, its mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy remains highly controversial. Recent reports show that the development of cell-based resistance after continuous RBV treatment via decreased RBV uptake can greatly limit its efficacy. Here, we examined whether certain cell types are naturally resistant to RBV even without prior drug exposure. Seven different cell lines from various host species were compared for RBV antiviral activity against two nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a rhabdovirus) and Sendai virus (SeV, a paramyxovirus). Our results show striking differences between cell types in their response to RBV, ranging from virtually no antiviral effect to very effective inhibition of viral replication. Despite differences in viral replication kinetics for VSV and SeV in the seven cell lines, the observed pattern of RBV resistance was very similar for both viruses, suggesting that cellular rather than viral determinants play a major role in this resistance. While none of the tested cell lines was defective in RBV uptake, dramatic variations were observed in the long-term accumulation of RBV in different cell types, and it correlated with the antiviral efficacy of RBV. While addition of guanosine neutralized RBV only in cells already highly resistant to RBV, actinomycin D almost completely reversed the RBV effect (but not uptake) in all cell lines. Together, our data suggest that RBV may inhibit the same virus via different mechanisms in different cell types depending on the intracellular RBV metabolism. Our results strongly point out the importance of using multiple cell lines of different origin when antiviral efficacy and potency are examined for new as well as established drugs in vitro.

PMID:
20582319
PMCID:
PMC2889835
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0011265
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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