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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Aug;203(2):144.e1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2010.02.063. Epub 2010 Jul 1.

Pregnancy outcome after in utero exposure to colchicine.

Author information

1
Israeli Teratology Information Service and Israel Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to examine the fetal safety of colchicine.

STUDY DESIGN:

This was a prospective observational comparative cohort study regarding colchicine exposure during pregnancy including contacts to 2 Teratology Information Services in Israel from 1994 through 2006.

RESULTS:

In all, 238 colchicine-exposed pregnancies (97.0% first trimester) and 964 pregnancies with nonteratogenic exposure were followed up. Treatment indications were: familial Mediterranean fever (87.3%), Beh├žet disease (7.5%), or other (5.2%). The rate of major congenital anomalies was comparable between the groups (10/221 [4.5%] vs 35/908 [3.9%]; P = .648). There were no cytogenetic anomalies in the colchicine group. The median gestational age at delivery was earlier (39 [38-40] vs 40 [38-41] weeks; P < .001), the rate of preterm deliveries was higher (32/214 [15.0%] vs 51/867 [5.9%]; P < .001), and the median birthweight was lower (3000 [2688-3300] vs 3300 [2900-3600] g; P < .001) in the colchicine group.

CONCLUSION:

The present study suggests that colchicine does not appear to be a major human teratogen, and, probably, has no cytogenetic effect.

PMID:
20579964
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2010.02.063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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