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J Anat. 2010 Jun;216(6):717-23. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-7580.2010.01235.x.

Adaptation of rat jaw muscle fibers in postnatal development with a different food consistency: an immunohistochemical and electromyographic study.

Author information

1
Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, The University of Tokushima Graduate School of Oral Sciences, Tokushima, Japan. kamo@dent.tokushima-u.ac.jp

Abstract

The development of the craniofacial system occurs, among other reasons, as a response to functional needs. In particular, the deficiency of the proper masticatory stimulus affects the growth. The purpose of this study was to relate alterations of muscle activity during postnatal development to adaptational changes in the muscle fibers. Fourteen 21-day-old Wistar strain male rats were randomly divided into two groups and fed on either a solid (hard-diet group) or a powder (soft-diet group) diet for 63 days. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time), the total burst number and their average length exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining and their cross-sectional area was measured. All muscle fibers were identified as slow type I and fast type IIA, IIX or IIB (respectively, with increasing twitch contraction speed and fatigability). At lower activity levels (exceeding 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle was significantly higher in the soft-diet group than in the hard-diet group (P < 0.05). At higher activity levels (exceeding 20 and 50% of the peak activity), the duty time of the superficial masseter muscle in the soft-diet group was significantly lower than that in the hard-diet group (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the duty time of the anterior temporalis muscle at any muscle activity level. The percentage of type IIA fibers of the superficial masseter muscle in the soft-diet group was significantly lower than that in the hard-diet group (P < 0.01) and the opposite was true with regard to type IIB fibers (P < 0.05). The cross-sectional area of type IIX and type IIB fibers of the superficial masseter muscle was significantly smaller in the soft-diet group than in the hard-diet group (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the muscle fiber composition and the cross-sectional area of the anterior belly of the digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. In conclusion, for the jaw muscles of male rats reared on a soft diet, the slow-to-fast transition of muscle fiber was shown in only the superficial masseter muscle. Therefore, the reduction in the amount of powerful muscle contractions could be important for the slow-to-fast transition of the myosin heavy chain isoform in muscle fibers.

PMID:
20579175
PMCID:
PMC2952384
DOI:
10.1111/j.1469-7580.2010.01235.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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