Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychol Res. 2011 Mar;75(2):107-21. doi: 10.1007/s00426-010-0291-6. Epub 2010 Jun 24.

Learning expressive percussion performance under different visual feedback conditions.

Author information

1
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. a.brandmeyer@donders.ru.nl

Abstract

A study was conducted to test the effect of two different forms of real-time visual feedback on expressive percussion performance. Conservatory percussion students performed imitations of recorded teacher performances while receiving either high-level feedback on the expressive style of their performances, low-level feedback on the timing and dynamics of the performed notes, or no feedback. The high-level feedback was based on a Bayesian analysis of the performances, while the low-level feedback was based on the raw participant timing and dynamics data. Results indicated that neither form of feedback led to significantly smaller timing and dynamics errors. However, high-level feedback did lead to a higher proficiency in imitating the expressive style of the target performances, as indicated by a probabilistic measure of expressive style. We conclude that, while potentially disruptive to timing processes involved in music performance due to extraneous cognitive load, high-level visual feedback can improve participant imitations of expressive performance features.

PMID:
20574662
PMCID:
PMC3036826
DOI:
10.1007/s00426-010-0291-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center