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Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010 Jun;104(6):478-84. doi: 10.1016/j.anai.2010.04.014.

Salmeterol use and risk of hospitalization among emergency department patients with acute asthma.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The safety of inhaled long-acting beta2-agonists (LABAs) in the treatment of chronic asthma remains controversial and has not been evaluated in emergency department (ED) patients with acute asthma.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether ED patients undergoing long-term LABA therapy would have increased risk of asthma-related hospitalization compared with those not undergoing LABA therapy and whether concurrent long-term inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy would mitigate this risk.

METHODS:

Prospective cohort study of patients aged 12 to 54 years with acute asthma in 115 EDs. Four patient groups were created based on their asthma regimen: no ICS or salmeterol (group A), salmeterol monotherapy (group B), ICS monotherapy (group C), and combination ICS and salmeterol (group D).

RESULTS:

Of the 2,236 included patients, group A had 1,221 patients (55%), group B had 48 patients (2%), group C had 787 patients (35%), and group D had 180 patients (8%); 489 patients (22%) required hospitalization. In a multivariable model controlling for 20 factors and using group A as the reference, group B had an increased risk of hospitalization (odds ratio [OR], 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-4.9), whereas groups C (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8-1.5) and D (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.8-1.9) did not.

CONCLUSION:

Among ED patients with acute asthma, those undergoing salmeterol monotherapy had an increased risk of hospitalization; however, this risk was not seen among patients undergoing combination ICS-salmeterol therapy. Our findings provide data from a unique ED population on clinical response to acute asthma treatment among patients undergoing long-term LABA therapy.

PMID:
20568379
PMCID:
PMC2945216
DOI:
10.1016/j.anai.2010.04.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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