Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arch Surg. 2010 Jun;145(6):570-7. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2010.75.

Physician attitudes toward industry: a view across the specialties.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave Levy Place, Campus Box 1087, New York, NY 10029, USA. deborah.korenstein@mssm.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To explore attitudes of physicians from all specialties toward gifts from and interactions with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

DESIGN:

Anonymous, cross-sectional survey distributed and collected between June 1 and September 1, 2008.

SETTING:

Hospitals in the Mount Sinai School of Medicine consortium in the New York, New York, metropolitan area.

PARTICIPANTS:

Faculty and trainee physicians from all clinical departments.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Attitudes toward industry interactions and gifts and their appropriateness measured on 4-point Likert scales.

RESULTS:

A total of 590 physicians and medical students completed the survey (response rate, 67.0%); 351 (59.5%) were male, 230 (39.0%) were attending physicians, and 131 (23.7%) of 553 (excluding medical students) were from surgical specialties. Attitudes toward industry and gifts were generally positive: 72.2% found sponsored lunches appropriate, whereas 25.4% considered large gifts appropriate. Surgeons, trainees, and those unfamiliar with institutional policies on industry interactions held more positive attitudes than others and were more likely to deem some gifts appropriate, including industry funding of residency programs and, among surgeons, receiving meals, travel expenses, and payments for attending lectures. Nonattending physicians held more positive attitudes toward receiving meals in clinical settings, textbooks, and samples.

CONCLUSIONS:

Physicians continue to hold positive attitudes toward marketing-oriented activities of the pharmaceutical and device industries. Changes in medical culture and physician education focused on surgeons and trainees may align physician attitudes with current policy trends.

PMID:
20566978
PMCID:
PMC2891545
DOI:
10.1001/archsurg.2010.75
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center