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J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2010 Sep;51(3):331-5. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0b013e3181d70468.

Liver fat change in obese children after a 1-year nutrition-behavior intervention.

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1
Department of Radiology, San Paolo Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate whether a 1-year nutrition-behavior intervention based on normocaloric balanced diet and physical exercise may reduce liver fat in obese children.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Twenty-six obese children (11 boys and 15 girls), aged 6 to 14 years, underwent anthropometric, nutritional, metabolic, and liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations at baseline and after a 1-year nutrition-behavior intervention. Anthropometry included weight, height, waist and hip circumference, and total upper arm area. Body mass index z scores were calculated. Biochemistry included serum aminotransferases, lipid profile, glucose, and insulin. Liver steatosis was judged as hepatic fat fraction (FF) by MRI and was > or =9%.

RESULTS:

Prevalence of steatosis was 34.6% at baseline and declined to 7.7% after intervention (P < 0.0001). Mean (95% CI) reduction of liver FF was 8.0% (4.0%-12.0%). In 77.8% of children with liver steatosis at baseline, the FF declined lower than 9% at the end of intervention, going from a mean (SD) of 18.7% (9.1) to 1.3% (4.1), (P < 0.0001). At the end of the intervention, children showed a mean reduction in body mass index z score of 0.26 (0.11-0.41) and waist circumference of 1.46 (0.34-2.60) cm. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, ApoA1/ApoB ratio, and gamma-glutamyltransferase plasma values in plasma decreased at the end of intervention (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results suggest that in obese children nutritional-behavior interventions may reduce the liver fat.

PMID:
20562718
DOI:
10.1097/MPG.0b013e3181d70468
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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