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J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2010 Sep;19(6):859-67. doi: 10.1016/j.jse.2010.03.004. Epub 2010 Jun 15.

Outcomes of type II superior labrum, anterior to posterior (SLAP) repair: prospective evaluation at a minimum two-year follow-up.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

Abstract

HYPOTHESIS:

Patients with type II superior labrum, anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions will have improved function and decreased pain at a minimum of 2 years after arthroscopic SLAP repair using bioabsorbable suture anchor fixation.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The study population consisted of 48 patients who underwent arthroscopic SLAP repair. Subjective shoulder scores, range of motion, and strength (postoperative only) were assessed preoperatively and at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively.

RESULTS:

At an average of 3.4 years after surgery, statistically significant improvement was seen in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, University of California, Los Angeles score, Simple Shoulder Test scores, Constant activities of daily living, visual analog scale for pain, and Short Form-12 Health Survey physical outcome scores. Improvements were made in forward flexion, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation. Subgroup analysis of nonathletes, nonoverhead athletes, recreational overhead athletes, and collegiate overhead athletes showed preoperative to postoperative improvements in subjective outcomes scores. Overhead laborers and nonlaborers also showed preoperative to postoperative improvements in subjective shoulder scores.

DISCUSSION:

No differences were seen between the outcomes of nonathletes, nonoverhead athletes, recreational overhead athletes, and collegiate overhead athletes, suggesting that SLAP type II repair is successful independent of the patient's vocation or sport.

CONCLUSION:

These results show that arthroscopic SLAP repair of type II lesions with bioabsorbable suture anchors provides a significant improvement in functional capacity and pain relief.

PMID:
20554453
PMCID:
PMC3869567
DOI:
10.1016/j.jse.2010.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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